Cooking with Asian mothers

  • Me: How much time do I give it? When will I know it's ready?
  • Mother: Focus on the bubbles, when the bubbles bubble a certain way you will know it's ready
  • Me:
  • Mother:
  • Me:
  • Mother:
  • Me: I can't tell whether the bubbles are bubbling differently than before
  • Mother: Get out of my kitchen.

(via yeahgoodluckwiththat)

markhartmanphoto:

The Golden Temple, Amritsar, India 2014

(via where-we-live)

#India   #Amritsar  

afghanistaninphotos:

Humans of Kabul

  1. "Why did you decide to stay in Afghanistan to go to university, when you could have studied in the U.S. on a scholarship?"
    "This is Afghanistan and I am an Afghan - I feel like not all of us should leave! I was happy to get a scholarship from an American university, but it was a dream come true when I received a full scholarship from a private Afghan university. I believe that there is so much I can learn and do if I am in Afghanistan. I can volunteer, I can pass on what I learn, I can be an activist, I can protect rights, I can vote, I can develop a business, I can make the unheard voice heard … and so much more!"
  2. "The happiest day of my life was when the Taliban left Kabul. I came out of my house and there were Afghan soldiers on the streets keeping the peace."
  3. "So what is the best part about the zoo?" 
    "I work for the Environmental Protection Agency of Afghanistan, so I want my children to have the chance to learn about the animals." 
  4. "What advice do you have for parents?"
    "I advise all parents to give their children education. Do not let them work for money when they are young."
  5. “So, can you tell me what you’re doing here?”
    “This bike riding club is to encourage girls to ride here in Kabul. There are so many girls that won’t bike because they think that the culture won’t allow for it, and so they have to walk for long distances instead. Also, there’s not a lot of sports facilities for women, so biking is a great option to exercise.”
  6. Little humans of Kabul. They love that lion statue at the Kabul Zoo …
  7. "What’s your favorite part about flying kites?
    "Fighting other kites!"
  8. "What do you want to be when you grow up?"
    "A journalist. Like my mom."

(via salamalaikum)

theashleysuzanne:

Palghar, India.

(via yeh-hai-meri-kahaani)

deadliestsnatch:

tranqualizer:

mayosjustanickname:

diasporicdecay:

pocketostars:

ancientrelic:

humansofnewyork:

“After this I go to work at a pizza shop. My wife and I were college professors in Bangladesh. I taught accounting. But one dollar in America becomes eighty dollars when we send it back home.”

People forget, when immigrants come to this country they start from scratch. They could have been lawyers in their home country, but in the US..it means nothing. You think a HS diploma from Bangladesh means anything in this country? My mom was a top student in the country, went to all the best school and got the best of everything…but when she got here it meant squat and she was cleaning other people’s homes and scrubbing their toilets. This is why I get pissed of when people talk smack about immigrants. They at least are doing something…..heading for a goal..making sacrifices…what are you doing with your life? 

^ My parents were college-educated teachers in their home country and came to the U.S. with nothing but empty pockets, a dash of hope, and a belief in God. They also scrubbed toilets in people’s homes to make enough to provide for their children, and that’s probably not something a lot of educated professionals would be able to do. I know I wouldn’t be able to do it. Pride would get in the way.

THIS IS TOO IMPORTANT.

Shoutout to my parents

and you know, shout out to our im/migrant parents who were not college educated before they came to the U.S and don’t share a narrative of going from “riches to rags.” shout out to my im/migrant parents who were laborers at home and are still laborers here.

i think it’s important to honor the complexities of our parents histories and uplift their triumphs but let’s remember to do so in a way that honors all of the ways im/migrants exist and all of the places we and our parents come from. we don’t have to prove that capitalism, white supremacy, classism, etc is awful because our parents were once revered college professors or doctors. we don’t have to believe in that assimilation. 

This is a very very important post

^^

(via desiboyyy)

"Good Morning"
“How was your day?”
“Be careful”
“Text me when you get home so I know you’re safe”
“Sweet dreams”
“How are you?”
“I hope you’re feeling better”
“Have a good day today!”
“I miss you”
“Good night”
“Can you come over?”
“Can I come over?”
“Can I see you?”
“Can I call you?”
“You’re beautiful”
“Want something to drink?”
“Watch your step”
“Let’s watch a movie”
“What are you up to?”
“How is your day so far?”
“It will be okay”
“I’m here for you”
“Do you need anything?”
“Are you hungry?”
“I just wanted to hear your voice”
“You just made my day”

You don’t have to hear “I Love You” to know that someone does. Listen carefully. People speak from the heart more often than you think.

Indian stamps

#India   #stamps  

(via jaiindia-chile)

kurumpu:

Rajasthani Woman in Pink Sari

Fridmar Damm

(via yeh-hai-meri-kahaani)

#India  

dastaanewatan:

Children at school in Lahore in 1940s.

neetika:

beautifulsouthasianbrides:

Photos by:Annuj

http://www.impressionsbyannuj.com/

"That Romantic Engagement Session in India"

I want this so cuteee

(via naraazgi)

goldenveil:

Dome of Rock / Palestine

(via lespritmodestee)

(via yeh-hai-meri-kahaani)

faromush:

Tajikistan

(via iuvencula)